Syrian immigrants: The ugly face of West’s humanization

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Syrian immigrants have been making their home in Allentown, Pa., for more than a century. They began settling there in the late 1800s, first to work as peddlers and later to work in factories. Today the town is home to one of the largest Syrian populations in the U.S. It’s also a destination for newer arrivals — refugees fleeing the ongoing crisis in Syria. But Allentown residents don’t agree on whether the town should welcome more of them. On the other side America is clearly divided over these victims of terrorism and politicians are helping them rush to conclusions by not stating the fact that these people are fleeing persecution. Daesh is looting, slaying, plundering and wiping out enitre populations and making a show of it on social media channels.Syria ‘s conflict has claimed over 250,000 lives; over 12 million have been uprooted from their homes, and only 1,500 have been resettled in 35 US states so far. It ‘s a trickle when compared to Europe which is facing the brunt of the exodus with thousands pouring in every day. But American politicians, who are in a hurry to fudge the figures, do not see it that way with the presidential race heating up. They are eager to portray the Syrian refugee crisis as a threat to national security. Daesh and the Syrian government have caused this exodus in the first place, but this is lost on US politicians who are selling their own stories about a shocking conflict and its victims to their domestic audience. If only the White House had not dithered and intervened in Syria when President Assad was gassing his own people, this refugee situation, which some call the largest since World War II, would not have happened.There is talk of internment camps for refugees and sending them back when the situation improves in Syria; calling in the National Guard to protect US citizens and banning welfare for refugees. What was even more shocking were comments made by another Republican presidential candidate, Ben Carson. The neurosurgeon compared Syrian refugees in the United States to rabid dogs.

 

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